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start:hype_tutorials:hype_setup_tutorial [2017/05/12 09:11]
cpers [Bifurcations (BranchData.txt)]
start:hype_tutorials:hype_setup_tutorial [2018/08/10 15:31] (current)
cpers [Climate Data]
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 |//Figure 3: The subbasin border is drawn to fit the outlet to the gauging station.//| |//Figure 3: The subbasin border is drawn to fit the outlet to the gauging station.//|
  
-Each subbasin must receive a unique subbasin ID (SUBID) and the SUBID of the subbasin next downstream to explain the routing, see figure 4. This is mandatory for the model and described in geodata.txt(länka till stycket längre ned i detta document)+Each subbasin must receive a unique subbasin ID (SUBID) and the SUBID of the subbasin next downstream to explain the routing, see figure 4. This is mandatory for the model and described in GeoData.txt (more info [[start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial#​input_data_geodatatxt|here]]).
  
 |{{ :​start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial:​figure4.png?​direct&​700 |}}| |{{ :​start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial:​figure4.png?​direct&​700 |}}|
 |//Figure 4: Routing between sub-basins. SUBID 103 is next downstream to SUBID 102. SUBID 102 is next downstream to SUBID 101 and 104.//| |//Figure 4: Routing between sub-basins. SUBID 103 is next downstream to SUBID 102. SUBID 102 is next downstream to SUBID 101 and 104.//|
  
-To describe the landuse and soil properties for each subbasin in the model, these are combined into so called SLC (Soil and Landuse Classes) classes (for example forest + medium soils, open land + fine soils etc), see figure 5. The distribution of SLC classes for each subbasin is described in geodata.txt and the SLC classes are defined in geoclass.txt (länka till stycket längre ned i detta document). +To describe the landuse and soil properties for each subbasin in the model, these are combined into so called SLC (Soil and Landuse Classes) classes (for example forest + medium soils, open land + fine soils etc), see figure 5. The distribution of SLC classes for each subbasin is described in geodata.txt and the SLC classes are defined in GeoClass.txt  (more info [[start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial#​input_data_geoclasstxt|here]]).
  
 Keep landuse and soil classes essential and typical for the model domain but merge classes into a number you will manage to calibrate. Keep landuse and soil classes essential and typical for the model domain but merge classes into a number you will manage to calibrate.
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 |//Figure 5: Soil and landuse information is combined into SLC classes. Each subbasin is described with the proportion of the different classes in GeoData.txt.//​| |//Figure 5: Soil and landuse information is combined into SLC classes. Each subbasin is described with the proportion of the different classes in GeoData.txt.//​|
  
-Lakes can be included to the model in two ways: as local lakes (ilakes) or as outlet lakes (olakes), see figure 6. The outlet lakes can be provided with rating curves and/or regulation schemes in lakedata.txt(Länka till stycket längre ned i detta document) The outlet lakes could be inserted as subbasins with their outlets corresponding to the subbasin outlet, see figure 7.+Lakes can be included to the model in two ways: as local lakes (ilakes) or as outlet lakes (olakes), see figure 6. The outlet lakes can be provided with rating curves and/or regulation schemes in LakeData.txt (more info [[start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial#​information_about_outlet_lakes_lakedatatxt|here]])The outlet lakes could be inserted as subbasins with their outlets corresponding to the subbasin outlet, see figure 7.
  
 |{{ :​start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial:​figure6.png?​direct&​300 |}}| |{{ :​start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial:​figure6.png?​direct&​300 |}}|
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 Read more about these processes [[start:​hype_model_description:​hype_land&#​snow_routines| in the model description]]. Read more about these processes [[start:​hype_model_description:​hype_land&#​snow_routines| in the model description]].
  
-The model could use different types of PET (potential evaporation) models (http://​www.smhi.net/​hype/​wiki/​doku.php?​id=start:​hype_model_description:​processes_above_ground#​alternative_potential_evaporation_models). The different options for calculation of potential evapotranspiration requires additional forcing data, e.g. potential evaporation,​ extra-terrestrial radiation, daily min and max air temperatures,​ shortwave radiation, relative humidity, wind speed. ​+The model could use different types of PET (potential evaporation) models ([[http://​www.smhi.net/​hype/​wiki/​doku.php?​id=start:​hype_model_description:​processes_above_ground#​alternative_potential_evaporation_models|Alternative potential evaporation models]]). The different options for calculation of potential evapotranspiration requires additional forcing data, e.g. potential evaporation,​ extra-terrestrial radiation, daily min and max air temperatures,​ shortwave radiation, relative humidity, wind speed. ​
  
 The HYPE code is continuously under development and new opportunities to force the model may be developed in the future. See http://​hype.sourceforge.net/ ​ for news. The HYPE code is continuously under development and new opportunities to force the model may be developed in the future. See http://​hype.sourceforge.net/ ​ for news.
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 [[start:​hype_file_reference:​geoclass.txt|GeoClass.txt]] is a file that defines the properties of the Soil and Landuse Classes (SLC) in geodata. It also describes special classes (lakes and glaciers), the number and depths of the soil layers. [[start:​hype_file_reference:​geoclass.txt|GeoClass.txt]] is a file that defines the properties of the Soil and Landuse Classes (SLC) in geodata. It also describes special classes (lakes and glaciers), the number and depths of the soil layers.
  
-Figure 8 shows a typical GeoClass.txt file. The first three rows contain comments, here some class ID references for different columns. These rows are denoted with an exclamation mark “!”. The column heads on row 4 are also just comments and not necessary for HYPE since the order of columns is predefined. The first column describes the SLC id. This id links geoclass to the SLC information in geodata.txt. The second and third column describes the combination of landuse and soil in the SLC. Lakes (here: SLC 1 and 2) have 2 rows here. One for the special class 1 (outlet lake) and one for the special class 2 (internal lake). Glaciers also have a figure (3) in the special class column. All classes have got a figure for the vegetation type. This is only used for the NP simulations though. Crops have got a tile-depth in this example. It describe the distance from soil surface to the tile drainage system. Drain depth is the distance from soil surface to local stream depth. The last 4 columns describe the number of soil layers and the depth of these layers from soil surface to bottom of each soil layer. ​+Figure 8 shows a typical GeoClass.txt file. The first three rows contain comments, here some class ID references for different columns. These rows are denoted with an exclamation mark “!”. The column heads on row 4 are also just comments and not necessary for HYPE since the order of columns is predefined. The first column describes the SLC id. This id links geoclass to the SLC information in GeoData.txt. The second and third column describes the combination of landuse and soil in the SLC. Lakes (here: SLC 1 and 2) have 2 rows here. One for the special class 1 (outlet lake) and one for the special class 2 (internal lake). Glaciers also have a figure (3) in the special class column. All classes have got a figure for the vegetation type. This is only used for the NP simulations though. Crops have got a tile-depth in this example. It describe the distance from soil surface to the tile drainage system. Drain depth is the distance from soil surface to local stream depth. The last 4 columns describe the number of soil layers and the depth of these layers from soil surface to bottom of each soil layer. ​
  
 |{{ :​start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial:​figure8.png?​direct&​700 |}}| |{{ :​start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial:​figure8.png?​direct&​700 |}}|
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 Geodata.txt holds information about the subbasins, i.e. routing, area, mean elevation, fraction of SLCs, parameter regions, general lake depths etc. See [[start:​hype_file_reference:​geodata.txt|GeoData.txt]] for a comprehensive reference on GeoData.txt columns. Geodata.txt holds information about the subbasins, i.e. routing, area, mean elevation, fraction of SLCs, parameter regions, general lake depths etc. See [[start:​hype_file_reference:​geodata.txt|GeoData.txt]] for a comprehensive reference on GeoData.txt columns.
  
-The structure of a GeoData.txt files is shown in Fig. 9. The first column holds the ROWNR to keep the order of the rows since the subbasins have to be ordered in a downstream sequence starting at headwaters and ending at outlet basins. The columns SUBID and MAINDOWN (0=outlet to the sea) hold the routing information (see green cells). The columns may be in any order. The mandatory columns for simulating water are: SUBID, MAINDOWN, AREA, ICATCH, RIVLEN and SLC_nn, but it is also recommended to use LAKE_DEPTH and ELEV_MEAN. If you use a [[start:​hype_file_reference:​lakedata.txt|LakeData.txt]] file for tailored data on lake properties, you need to link to this file in the column named LAKEDATAID (see blue cell). The parameter regions (which can be used in par.txt ​ to correct some parameters according to regions) are described in PARREG column. The sum of the SLCs should always be =1. See the geodata.txt for more information about the geodata columns.+The structure of a GeoData.txt files is shown in Fig. 9. The first column holds the ROWNR to keep the order of the rows since the subbasins have to be ordered in a downstream sequence starting at headwaters and ending at outlet basins. The columns SUBID and MAINDOWN (0=outlet to the sea) hold the routing information (see green cells). The columns may be in any order. The mandatory columns for simulating water are: SUBID, MAINDOWN, AREA, ICATCH, RIVLEN and SLC_nn, but it is also recommended to use LAKE_DEPTH and ELEV_MEAN. If you use a [[start:​hype_file_reference:​lakedata.txt|LakeData.txt]] file for tailored data on lake properties, you need to link to this file in the column named LAKEDATAID (see blue cell). The parameter regions (which can be used in par.txt ​ to correct some parameters according to regions) are described in PARREG column. The sum of the SLCs should always be =1. See the [[start:​hype_file_reference:​geodata.txt|GeoData.txt]] ​for more information about the geodata columns.
  
 |{{ :​start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial:​figure9.png?​direct&​700 |}}| |{{ :​start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial:​figure9.png?​direct&​700 |}}|
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 It is necessary that the subbasins are ordered in a downstream sequence. [[https://​github.com/​rcapell/​RHYPE/​|RHYPE]] includes a function //​SortGeoData()//​ for this purpose. It is necessary that the subbasins are ordered in a downstream sequence. [[https://​github.com/​rcapell/​RHYPE/​|RHYPE]] includes a function //​SortGeoData()//​ for this purpose.
  
-When GeoData.txt has been constructed it is always ​agood idea to check the tailoring of the data. Join the geodata.txt to the subbasin shapefile and produce some maps for spatial check, ​ i.e. ELEV_MEAN, summerized LandUse and Soilclasses. ​ A function //​GroupSLCClasses()//​ from RHYPE can be helpful. To check the routing you can map each sub-basin'​s catchment area (from WHIST: AREA+UPAREA,​ from RHYPE: //​SumUpstreamArea()//​) and get a view of the network. ​+When GeoData.txt has been constructed it is always ​a good idea to check the tailoring of the data. Join the geodata.txt to the subbasin shapefile and produce some maps for spatial check, ​ i.e. ELEV_MEAN, summerized LandUse and Soilclasses. ​ A function //​GroupSLCClasses()//​ from RHYPE can be helpful. To check the routing you can map each sub-basin'​s catchment area (from WHIST: AREA+UPAREA,​ from RHYPE: //​SumUpstreamArea()//​) and get a view of the network. ​
  
 ==== Input data, P(obs), T(obs), ForcKey ==== ==== Input data, P(obs), T(obs), ForcKey ====
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 ===== Setting up optional input files for HYPE ===== ===== Setting up optional input files for HYPE =====
  
-There are many optional components in HYPE. Below we describe some of the most commonly used optional model components, lakes and reservoirs and bifurcations,​ which often have large impact on the hydrology in large-scale river basins.+There are many optional components in HYPE. Below we describe some of the most commonly used optional model components, lakes and reservoirs and bifurcations,​ which often have large impact on the hydrology in large-scale river basins. Others can be found among the tutorials (e.g. [[start:​hype_tutorials:​floodplain_tutorial|floodplains]]).
 ==== Information about outlet lakes (LakeData.txt)==== ==== Information about outlet lakes (LakeData.txt)====
  
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   * Link the outlet lakes to the SUBID’s of your model.   * Link the outlet lakes to the SUBID’s of your model.
-  * Complete ​lakedata.txt, see Fig. 15, with lake depths, outlet curves, regulation volumes, regulation routines, etc. where available. Use default depth for lakes where data is not available. A lot of information can be found on internet.  +  * Complete ​LakeData.txt, see Fig. 15, with lake depths, outlet curves, regulation volumes, regulation routines, etc. where available. Use default depth for lakes where data is not available. A lot of information can be found on internet.  
-  * Geodata.txt must have a link to lakedata.txt. The column ​lakadataid” is used in both geodata.txt and lakedata.txt for this purpose.+  * GeoData.txt must have a link to LakeData.txt. The column ​''​lakadataid'' ​is used in both GeoData.txt and LakeData.txt for this purpose.
   * Calibrate outlet curves and regulation routines for lakes with gauging stations near the outlet (i.e. run HYPE)   * Calibrate outlet curves and regulation routines for lakes with gauging stations near the outlet (i.e. run HYPE)
   * General rating curves or regulation routines may be possible to use for different regions or reservoirs for different purposes if no discharge data or water level data is available.   * General rating curves or regulation routines may be possible to use for different regions or reservoirs for different purposes if no discharge data or water level data is available.
  
 |{{ :​start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial:​figure15.png?​direct&​700 |}}| |{{ :​start:​hype_tutorials:​hype_setup_tutorial:​figure15.png?​direct&​700 |}}|
-|//Figure 15 (click to enlarge): Example of LakeData.txt. The LakeDataID is the link between GeoData.txt and LakeData.txt files. If a SUBID has a LakeDataID in GeoData.txt,​ the olake in this SUBID will be calculated according to the information in LakeData.txt. Black rows show some typical lakes, blue rows shows an example how to set up a multi-basin lake. The first blue row (bold) summerizes all basins. The red rows show some typical reservoirs. See more information about this file in [[start:​hype_file_reference:​lakedata.txt|Lakedata.txt]].//|+|//Figure 15 (click to enlarge): Example of LakeData.txt. The LakeDataID is the link between GeoData.txt and LakeData.txt files. If a SUBID has a LakeDataID in GeoData.txt,​ the olake in this SUBID will be calculated according to the information in LakeData.txt. Black rows show some typical lakes, blue rows shows an example how to set up a multi-basin lake. The first blue row (bold) summerizes all basins. The red rows show some typical reservoirs. See more information about this file in [[start:​hype_file_reference:​lakedata.txt|LakeData.txt]].//|
  
  
start/hype_tutorials/hype_setup_tutorial.1494573111.txt.gz · Last modified: 2017/05/12 09:11 by cpers